Latest Stories

Many people across Britain will have felt buoyed and excited by the Labour manifestoMoneyz.jpg

For the first time in modern memory we have a positive, optimistic set of pledges that promise to solve the issues limiting our opportunities and stifling our potential. We are presented with a cadre of promises that will protect our public services while enabling all people, regardless of wealth or privilege, to achieve, get on in life, and be fairly rewarded for their hard work.

But do they make economic sense?

Labour is pledging billions of pounds for, among other things, schools, university tuition fees and a National Investment Bank to drive forward major infrastructure projects – something that is supported by eminent economists.

The Conservatives and the right-wing press will claim these policies will bankrupt the country. In fact, it is quite the opposite. By investing in productivity through skills and infrastructure a Labour Government will enable enterprise and innovation and increase productivity. The result? Far stronger economic growth.

One only needs to note the example of energy price caps to see through the duplicity of the right-wing press and understand that they cannot be trusted to assess policies fairly. When Ed Miliband proposed energy price caps they denounced it as Marxist chaos. Now that Theresa May has proposed the same policy they laud it as saving money for working families. When they try and undermine sensible arguments about investing in productivity and economic growth they must be ignored.

The thinking behind many of Labour’s spending plans can be explained using the example of a small business as an analogy for the economy. For the small business owner it would be unwise to borrow money and spend beyond their means for day-to-day costs – the cost of running a van, for example. If, however, the business owner decides that a brand new piece of high tech equipment would make their processes more efficient then they might feel inclined to borrow money to invest in that piece of equipment. Having it would allow them to be more efficient, more productive and ultimately grow the business. Borrowing to invest in this fashion would not be seen as reckless – rather, a sensible business decision bringing long-term benefits.

Labour is proposing something very similar for the country’s economy. By investing in education, skills and infrastructure the party would be investing in improved efficiency, productivity and ultimately growth.

Businesses choose to invest in, and locate to, places with excellent infrastructure and highly skilled workers. The Tories and their supporters in the media claim that increasing corporation tax – one of the important ways Labour is ensuring its pledges can be paid for – will deter investment and lead to companies abandoning Britain.

Again, this is a total red herring. Companies invest in places with the infrastructure and workers they need to be productive and grow. A couple of percentage points on the rate of corporation tax will not force a company to up sticks. Take the examples of Germany and Japan. Their corporation tax rates are 30% but they have no trouble attracting companies and investors. Labour’s proposals would gradually increase the corporation tax to just 26% while investing in the infrastructure and skills that attract and ultimately benefit companies.

In terms of productivity Britain is flat lining and being outperformed by rivals including Germany, France, Italy and the USA. This is, in large part, due to a lack of investment and the high proportion of newly created jobs being low-skill, low-wage level. Only ambitious plans for major investment in our economy, its infrastructure and its workers – the wealth creators – will allow Britain to compete with her rivals.

The manifesto proposals are not the result of uncosted idealism. Even from a purely hard-headed economic perspective – ignoring for a moment the benefits they would bring for social justice and equality of opportunity – they are common sense policies.

Its pledges, in particular regarding skills and infrastructure, make it an incredibly pro-business manifesto. Companies which complain about the quality of school leavers and graduates will pay a little more and benefit from the subsequent investments being made in education. Companies desiring improvements to road and rail connectivity and superfast broadband will benefit from the National Investment Bank’s interventions.

Only the Labour party wants to invest in stronger productivity, improved economic growth, and an economy where workers are remunerated fairly for their work.

Only the Labour party wants to build a modern economy that will withstand the impact of Brexit and be competitive for decades to come.

The economic case for Labour’s manifesto

Many people across Britain will have felt buoyed and excited by the Labour manifesto.  For the first time in modern memory we have a positive, optimistic set of pledges that...

On Saturday Anawar Miah and an army of volunteers took Labour’s positive message to the people of Hatfield in White Lion Square.

During the course of conversations hundreds of people outlined their concerns and hopes, fears and ambitions. In response, Anawar explained his pledges to protect funding for our NHS, end the underfunding of our schools, ensure hardworking people are paid fairly, and enable everybody to fulfil their potential and get ahead in life.

Concerns raised by residents included Brexit and the economic effects it will have, NHS funding, school places and classroom sizes, low wages, lack of affordable housing,  and what kind of future their children and grandchildren will have in years to come.

The response to Labour’s ‘leaked’ manifesto pledges was overwhelmingly positive and it was generally accepted that the ambitious policies would go a long way to tackling the country’s problems head-on.

A few people wanted to know more about how the pledges would be paid for and the plans to reverse tax cuts for corporations and capital gains were explained.

There were a few undecided voters who were still making their minds up on Jeremy Corbyn and wanted to explore the party leaders and their policies in greater detail. All, however, accepted that at local level Anawar would put Welwyn Hatfield first and fight hard for the things residents care about.

There was a general sense of frustration at some of the things the Conservative Government and councillors have done and failed to do in recent years; the closure of the A&E at the QEII, the introduction of the bin tax, the neglect of town centre areas, the cutting of working tax credits, and the imposition of tuition fees were just some of the things that made residents feel let down.

Grant Shapps’ central role in the 2015 electoral fraud allegations had clearly angered a number of voters who also remembered his false name-second job debacle. The promise of an open, honest representative was seen as a welcome antidote for them.

By the end of the day hundreds of leaflets had been handed out and many potential first-time voters convinced they should register to have a say on their future on 8 June.

Anawar is itching to hit the pavements again and will be out and about trying to meet as many people as possible before Election Day. After such a positive outing in Hatfield he is optimistic that Labour’s unspun message of hope, belief and positivity – free from empty soundbites – will get through. 

 

Flying the flag for the many not the few in Hatfield

On Saturday Anawar Miah and an army of volunteers took Labour’s positive message to the people of Hatfield in White Lion Square. During the course of conversations hundreds of people...

 

 

We entered this election with two County Council seats and we’ve come out with two County Council Seats. Labours total vote in these elections rose from 2013, and here in Welwyn Hatfield we managed to avoid the much talked about ‘Labour Wipeout’ and hold back the ‘Lib Dem Surge’ in the local County Elections.

Unfortunately, despite much hard work, we were unable to secure a Labour win in the Panshanger by election for the Borough Council. Thank you to our hardworking candidate Lucy Musk and all who helped her.

Labour Hold in County Council Elections

    We entered this election with two County Council seats and we’ve come out with two County Council Seats. Labours total vote in these elections rose from 2013, and...

More Stories >

The Labour Party will place cookies on your computer to help us make this website better.

Please read this to review the updates about which cookies we use and what information we collect on our site.

To find out more about these cookies, see our privacy notice. Use of this site confirms your acceptance of these cookies.